Details of our events for the public and schools are posted below - we update this list and add new events regularly.

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  • Some essential links between maths and the arts

    Date: 
    Thursday, 12 March 2015 - 5:30pm to 6:30pm

    Join Professor John D Barrow to explore a range of links between mathematics and some of the arts: identify Dali's use of 4-d geometry, ask if fractals distinguish abstract art works, plan the subterranean Tunnel of Eupalinos in 520BC, find the best place to view a statue, and calculate the distance to the horizon. We will discover how smooth curves informed architecture, the creation of text fonts, and Henry Moore's stringed sculptures. Finally, we look at the beginnings of the probabilistic analysis of literary texts.

    The event is free but admission is by ticket only: online ticket booking will open at the beginning of February.

    This event forms part of the 2015 Cambridge Science Festival.

    Level: 
    General public
    Level additional information: 
    General public; suggested age range 15+
  • El Niño: what on earth will happen next?

    Date: 
    Thursday, 19 March 2015 - 5:30pm to 6:30pm
    Speaker: 
    Dr Michael Davey

    El Niño events are the largest causes of year-to-year climate variability on a global scale, bringing floods to some regions and droughts to others. Join Dr Michael Davey as he explains the phenomenon, explores the impacts, and describes how maths helps us understand how they occur and evolve.

    Dr Michael Davey is a research scientist at the Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, with the atmosphere-ocean research group. He is also employed part-time by the Met Office, in the monthly-to-decadal variability and prediction group.

    This event is free but admission is by ticket only: online ticket booking will open at the beginning of February.

    This event forms part of the 2015 Cambridge Science Festival.

    Level: 
    General public
    Level additional information: 
    General public: suggested age range 15+
  • Cambridge Science Festival Maths Public Open Day

    Date: 
    Saturday, 21 March 2015 - 12:00pm to 4:00pm

    From Isaac Newton onwards, Cambridge has been associated with some of the most famous mathematicians in history. Modern mathematicians and theoretical physicists work on everything from number theory to the Big Bang; exotic geometries to fluid dynamics; black holes, superstrings and particle physics; statistics in finance, health and league tables; and modelling climate change to investigating the spread of disease. Join students and staff from the Faculty of Mathematics to explore the excitement and scope of this rich, diverse and creative subject, through hands on activities and demonstrations for all ages from 8 to adult.

    This event is part of the 2015 Cambridge Science Festival. No advance booking needed - drop in throughout the event (12 noon - 4pm).

    Level: 
    General public
    Level additional information: 
    For all ages from 8 to adult!
  • Thinking Mathematically

    Date: 
    Saturday, 21 March 2015 - 12:15pm to 1:15pm

    Join Charlie Gilderdale to work on some of his favourite mathematical problems from NRICH, and discover that everyone can think mathematically. Come prepared to explore, discuss, conjecture, question, explain and generalise!

    This highly interactive talk will include lots of opportunities to work on mathematical problem-solving activities, and is aimed at ages 11 to 13. Please note: all under-14s must be accompanied by a supervising adult (who can join in too!).

    This event is part of the Cambridge Science Festival. No booking needed, but places are limited: please arrive in good time for the start. Doors will open at 12 noon.

    Level additional information: 
    For ages 11-13: must be accompanied by a supervising adult.
  • The Large Hadron Collider and The Dark Matter Mystery

    Date: 
    Saturday, 21 March 2015 - 2:00pm to 3:00pm

    The Large Hadron Collider will start operation again at a higher energy at the beginning of 2015. Join Professor Ben Allanach for an introduction to the machine, particle physics and the discovery of the Higgs boson. Standard theory predicts that the quantum fluctuations should make the Higgs boson much heavier than it is observed to be, but a speculative theory of particle physics (supersymmetry) explains why the quantum fluctuations are small. This theory predicts a host of new particles for the LHC to find.

    There were a few small anomalies in LHC data already that can be interpreted as the production of certain supersymmetric particles. One of the predicted supersymmetric particles has the right properties to be the mysterious dark matter observed in the universe. Such interpretations are ready for further experimental testing next year.

    This event is part of the 2015 Cambridge Science Festival. No booking needed, but please arrive in good time for the start of the talk.

    Level: 
    General public
    Level additional information: 
    Suggested age range 15+